HOME STORE GALLERY ARTIST WORKSHOPS ARTICLES SITE MAP CONTACT
Updated 7/25/11
.
Pictures of Caryl Bryer Fallert's private, sewing and design studio
Click on the small pictures below for larger images. Use your BACK button to return to this page.
.

Often the hardest task in any creative project is knowing what you want. For many years I fantasized about having a place where students could come to my studio to take classes, and where I could surround myself with creative people. When I built this building, I was lucky enough to be able to build exactly what I wanted. I knew that I needed solitude for my own creative process, so I put my personal design and sewing studio on the second floor, and the shop, shipping department, and classroom on the first floor, so I can continue working when others are using my first floor spaces. This building is far larger than I need for just myself. I designed it so it could be filled with creative people, and I'm thrilled that it often is.

My studio is designed to promote creativity and positive energy. The art and objects I choose to bring into my space are intentionally uplifting and inspiring. I welcome visitors, so don't hesitate to stop by when you are traveling through Western Kentucky. I am open by appointment or by chance. If you call ahead you can be sure to catch me. If you ring the doorbell and I'm here, I'm usually open. Click here for information about our workshops.

Diagram of studio. Click for larger image
Click for larger diagram
134 k Faster loading
2.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
 

In 2005, when I built my studio/gallery/workshop center/home in the historic LowerTown Arts District of Paducah Kentucky, I was able to use the best features of my previous studios and arrange them in my new space with plenty of room to move around. I do all of my designing, publishing, and sewing in one large room on the second floor of my building. I feel like I'm working in a tree house up here, and I have a wonderful view of my neighborhood from my second floor perch.

I do all of my designing, publishing, and correspondence on one end of the room. On the design and publishing end are wraparound desks, with computers, printers, scanners, and files, plus photo archives of previous work and a counter top for drawing and layout.  

Click for larger images
144k Faster loading
4.6M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Click pictures for the whole story and larger images.

The two quilts on the end wall (above) are Farewell to the Silver Bird and Death, Taxes and Dandelions. On the side wall is Mother's Day.

The other end of the room is the sewing and quilting area (below), and that's where all the fun happens.

 

Click for larger images
138k Faster loading
4.2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

 

Click for larger images
132k Faster loading
4.2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Two domestic Bernina sewing machines and a Legacy industrial machine with 21 inches under the head for quilting are set up next to windows for good light.
Click for larger images
136k Faster loading
4.2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
138k Faster loading
3.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
The industrial machine and one of the Berninas face each other with a full 4 feet of tabletop space between them (needle to needle) to support large quilts.
Click for larger images
130k Faster loading
4.1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
133k Faster loading
4.2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Quick release clamps hang from the ceiling to hold the bulk and weight of a large quilt so I can move the part I'm working on with my fingertips. The quick release clamps can be found in the hardware department of any big-box home center like Home Depot, or Lowes. I drilled a hole in one handle, and a cord (called parachute cord) runs through the hole to the ceiling hooks. The length of the cord (and height of the clamps) can be adjusted by using cord locks. Cord locks are the little push-button things you find on sleeping bags, camping gear, and hooded jackets.
Click for larger images
141k Faster loading
4.1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
168k Faster loading
4.1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Click for larger images
178k Faster loading
3.45M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Next to the machine used for piecing is a counter-height ironing board (below) made from a 32" x 80" hollow core door covered with silicone fabric. Shelves support the board, and hold ironing supplies, so the top stays relatively clear. Beneath the board, within easy reach of my sewing chair, are Alvin taborets (drawer stacks) that hold the notions and threads I use for piecing.

Click for larger images
144k Faster loading
4.1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
148k Faster loading
4.7M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Larger Elfa drawer stacks hold cone thread near the machine used for quilting and six Alvin taborets along the end wall hold more threads and notions.
Click for larger images
153k Faster loading
5.25M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
150k Faster loading
4.75M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
The fabrics on the wall in the pictures above and below were among the happy surprises that happened occasionally when I was dye painting fabrics. I couldn't bear to cut them up, so I just hung them on the wall.
Click for larger images
155k Faster loading
2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
117k Faster loading
4.25M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
The wall opposite the sewing machines is my design wall, with four 4'x8' sheets of pinnable Homasote board covered in cream-colored flannel. Homasote is that cheap (usually under $10.00) insulation board, made of compressed sawdust, that you can buy at the big-box home centers. You used to be able to find it with a natural finish, but now it all seems to have a nasty black coating of some kind. I covered my boards with unbleached muslin first, and then covered them with a cream colored flannel. In each case I bought 109" wide fabric which is intended for quilt backing. You can rest your design boards on the floor, which I did in my previous studio, but in this studio they would have covered my electrical outlets. I bought white vinyl "J" channel in the vinyl siding department and screwed it to the wall to hold the bottoms and tops of my boards. In the cracks between the boards, half way between the bottom and the top, I have screws going into the wall. Each screw has a 1" washer slipped over the head, to hold the edges of the boards and prevent them from bulging. This wall happens to be one of many in the building that has a continuous layer of plywood behind the drywall, so I could anchor screws anywhere I wanted them.
Click for larger images
135k Faster loading
4.46M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
100k Faster loading
4.3M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
An 11' square, level-pile rug, used for blocking and as a background for many of my workshop presentations, lies in front of the design wall.
Click for larger images
115k Faster loading
3.9M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
146k Faster loading
4.6M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
I do a lot of drawing and rotary cutting on the floor, especially when I'm squaring up a large quilt, so a 5' x 10' rotary mat from quiltersrule.com lies on the floor next to the rug. For larger quilts I roll up the rug and use two giant mats side-by-side (below right).
Click for larger images
203k Faster loading
1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
174k Faster loading
4.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
I have a low center of gravity and good knees, so I can work on the floor. I also do Pilates three times a week to make sure I can still get up off the floor. After many hours of leaning over a sewing machine, it is easy to get a rounded back. I try to remember to stretch out and do a back bend over a Pilates ball several times a day. This helps strengthen the core muscles and reverses the direction of the spine.
Click for larger images
119k Faster loading
9M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
137k Faster loading
2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
In the center of the sewing area is a 40" x 72" cutting table (below left). A light box, used for both piecing and designing, is built into a counter top between the publishing/design end of the studio and the sewing end (below right).
Click for larger images
154k Faster loading
4.2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
157k Faster loading
4.6M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
A 3' closet with a custom 8' door holds extra 4x8 design boards. A pegboard on the side of the closet holds tools. The best idea borrowed from my previous studio: ceiling outlets with 30' retractable, cord-reel extension cords. I can have power anywhere in my workspace without jumping over cords, and my iron cord never drags across my freshly ironed fabric.
Click for larger images
134k Faster loading
4.1M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
122k Faster loading
2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Click for larger images
109k Faster loading
3.7M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

All of the fluorescent lighting in my studio is 6500 Kelvin, as close to sunlight as you can buy. The bulbs are GE SP65 four foot tubes.

My fabrics and quilts are stored in an adjacent 9' x 14' closet. In my previous studio, the boxes of fabric lined several walls and they were not the most attractive feature of the room. I fantasized about having an 8' extension on the building behind my design wall where the fabric could be stored. This is exactly what I built into my new studio. This 9' x 14' closet is behind the design wall. It has heat, air-conditioning, and color corrected work lights, but no outside light to fade the fabrics. The quilts that are not hanging in my gallery are also stored here.
Click for larger images
195k Faster loading
2M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
185k Faster loading
4.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
I moved to LowerTown Arts District of Paducah under the city's Artists Relocation Program, and one of the requirements was that artists live, work, and sell under one roof. My building is about 8000 square feet. (See diagrams below)
Click for larger image 681k

Click for larger image 552k
The building includes:
A small gallery/shop, where I sell the fabrics I design, my publications (patterns and workshops on CD), supplies needed in the classes I teach, and gift items with images of my work. Most of these items are also available through our Internet Store.
Click for larger images
184k Faster loading
4M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
183k Faster loading
4M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
900 square foot (30' x 30') center room that serves as gallery, community meeting room, and state of the art workshop space, with built-in projector, pull down screen, and overhead outlets (each wired to a separate circuit so we can run 20 sewing machines and 10 irons).
Click for larger images
189k Faster loading
3.6M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

During the big quilt show every April I cover the windows, and hang an exhibition of 20-30 art quilts (my latest work and an invitational exhibit of work by guest artists).

The rest of the year the walls are hung with my most recent work and selected older work.

Click for larger images
196k Faster loading
3.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
202k Faster loading
4M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Click for larger images
145k Faster loading
3.5M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

We offer in-depth workshops throughout the year, and can comfortably accommodate up to 20 students in design classes.

Click for larger images
161k Faster loading
3.5M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
151k Faster loading
3.4M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Our fiber arts group and other neighborhood groups meet here regularly, and the space is occasionally rented out to other community groups for meetings and lectures.
Paducah Fiber Artists Meeting
Click for larger images
174k Faster loading
3.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Lecture Set-up

Click for larger images
175k Faster loading
3.8M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Dye studio with floor drains and an industrial epoxy floor. It has double doors and is next to a patio, which can be used as an additional dyeing and painting area. This room also doubles as gallery space and auxiliary classroom space. In an adjoining utility room there are two washers, a double sink, and a dryer.
Click for larger images
98k Faster loading
3M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
158k Faster loading
3.6M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Entry hall and great room with some of my personal collections of art quilts by others, work from my LowerTown artist neighbors, and folk art from my travels around the world. This room has a 21' ceiling and the top half of the room is painted with blue sky, clouds, and a single bird.
Click for larger images
147k Faster loading
3.5M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
131k Faster loading
3.4M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Kitchen with 4'x10' island and room to seat thirty comfortably for lunch or dinner. This is a much larger kitchen than I need just for myself. We have catered lunches during our workshops, and when the National Quilt Museum has workshops I invite the classes over for lunch one day during the week. When I began planning to move to Paducah, I learned that virtually all the entertaining in the LowerTown Artists' community was potluck. I realized immediately that I had no need whatever for a formal dining room.
Click for larger images
158k Faster loading
3.5M This will take some time to load on slower connections.

Click for larger images
158k Faster loading
3.5M This will take some time to load on slower connections.
Guest accommodations:
We call it the Bryerpatch Studio B&C (bed and coffee, I don't cook breakfast but breakfast is available nearby). We welcome guests throughout the year, and can accommodate up to eight overnight guests during our in-house workshops. If you are traveling through Western Kentucky, or taking a workshops at the National Quilt Museum, consider staying here.

Each of our guest rooms has:
2 comfortable twin beds ~ 2 comfortable chairs ~ 2 bedside lamps with daylight bulbs ~ 9 spacious dresser drawers ~ desk with (free) ethernet port (our whole building also has free wireless) ~ private bath with full tub/shower and 5' vanity ~ 5'+ closet ~ door onto balcony ~ access to coffee maker, microwave, mini-fridge ~ elevator. Click or scroll down for more pictures and information.

We are smoke free- perfume free- pet free.

Overflow Room
When our guest rooms are full we also have an overflow room with four beds. We call it the quilters hostel. NOTE: This room is only available when our other guest rooms are full. Click here for information.
Click on the small pictures below for larger images
Use your BACK button to return to this page.
Guest Room 1:
2 twin beds

Guest Room 2:
1 full bed &
one twin bed

convenience room

We have a convenience room in the guest wing. It includes a mini-fridge, microwave, coffee maker, filtered drinking water, hair dryer, iron, ironing board and extra supplies for your room.

Back balcony: accessible from both guest rooms and the main second floor hallway. It's a great place to sit out and have coffee in the morning.

Elevator

If you can't climb stairs, or if you just don't want to lug your suitcases up, no problem. We have an elevator in the guest wing.

Our comfy guest lounge is also available for you to enjoy.

Reading & TV room in guest wing.
Directions:
HTML format (loads faster)
Printable (PDF) format (650K): may take a minute to load
click for larger image
larger (129K) image
I designed the whole building, full size, in Corel Draw, which is the same program I use for designing my quilts. I measured all of the furniture I owned, and all of the furniture I hoped to own, and arranged it the way I thought it would work the best. Then I drew walls around the working and living areas. I made the building L shaped to save the mature trees on the property, and added bays and bump-outs to make it look more interesting. I had six months to decide what I wanted, so I watched myself going through my work day and preparing for my travels, and tried to think of as many things as possible to make these tasks flow easily in the new space. My plans evolved as I thought of each new idea, just as my quilts evolve from a pencil sketch, and the building that was finally built was version #20 of my original plan. Like the lines in my quilts, most of the lines in my garden, walkways, and flower beds, are curves. I designed two stained glass windows that are based on my quilt designs and had them made by one of my artist neighbors. Many of the windows are topped by curved transoms, because they look graceful and fit well into our historic Victorian neighborhood.
click for larger image Front door of shop, with stained glass transom designed by Caryl and made by Wanda Sanders of Paducah. click for larger image Above the whirlpool tub is a stained glass window based on one of Caryl's quilt designs. The stained glass made by Wanda Sanders of Paducah. The whirlpool tub is surrounded by a lifetime collection of pebbles and shells picked up in my travels around the world.
For more pictures click here.


.

HOME STORE GALLERY ARTIST WORKSHOPS ARTICLES SITE MAP CONTACT

Web Site Design by Caryl Bryer Fallert 1997-2011 All Rights Reserved
Bryerpatch Studio • 502 N. 5th St. • Paducah, KY 42001 • USA
caryl@bryerpatch.com • 270-444-8040
.